Myers Briggs ESFP

The Artist

Myers Briggs ESFP






Myers Briggs ESFP - Summary

  • Outgoing friendly and accepting.
  • Exuberant lovers of life, people and material comforts.
  • Enjoy working with others to make things happen.
  • Bring common sense and a realistic approach to their work, and make work fun.
  • Flexible and spontaneous, adapt readily to new environments.
  • Learn best by trying a new skill with other people.





Myers Briggs ESFP - Characteristics


  • Myers Briggs ESFPs live in the moment, experiencing life to the fullest. They enjoy people, as well as material comforts. Rarely allowing conventions to interfere with their lives, they find creative ways to meet human needs.
  • They are excellent team players, focused on completing the task at hand with maximum fun and minimum discord. Active types, they find pleasure in new experiences.
  • ESFPs take a hands-on approach in most things. Because they learn more by doing than by studying or reading, they tend to rush into things, learning by interacting with their environment.
  • They usually dislike theory and written explanations. Traditional schools can be difficult for them, although they tend to do well when the subject of study interests them, or when they see the relevance of a subject and are allowed to interact with people.
  • Observant, practical, realistic, and specific, they make decisions according to their own personal standards. They use their "feeling judgment" internally to identify and empathise with others.
  • Naturally attentive to the world around them, ESFPs are keen observers of human behaviour. They quickly sense what is happening with other people and immediately respond to their individual needs. They are especially good at mobilising people to deal with crises.
  • Generous, optimistic, and persuasive, they are good at interpersonal interactions. They often play the role of peacemaker due to their warm, sympathetic, and tactful nature.
  • They love being around people and having new experiences. Living in the here-and-now, they often do not think about long-term effects or the consequences of their actions. While very practical, they generally despise routines, instead desiring to 'go with the flow.'
  • They are, in fact, very play minded. Because they learn better through hands-on experience, classroom learning may be troublesome for many of them, especially those with a very underdeveloped intuitive side.
  • Others usually see ESFPs as resourceful and supportive, as well as gregarious, playful, and spontaneous. They get a lot of satisfaction out of life and are fun to be around. Their exuberance and enthusiasm draw others to them. They are flexible, adaptable, congenial, and easygoing. They seldom plan ahead, trusting their ability to respond in the moment and deal effectively with whatever presents itself. They dislike structure and routine and will generally find ways to bend the rules.




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